Songs for the Devil and Death

It is with great pleasure that we announce the release of Songs for the Devil and Death, a collection of primal poetry by Hal Duncan.

Songs for the Devil and Death by Hal Duncan

Purchase at one of these sellers:
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Hal Duncan is perhaps best known for his novels Vellum and Ink, but as followers of Papaveria know he is also a poet whose incredible works have so far defied my ability to write a fitting blurb. I have interviewed Hal about his poetry here, and have been struggling for a week to create a viable advert for this most impressive book. The only thing I can say to you now is buy the book and see for yourself what fury Hal has unleashed.

They tell me poetry is a hard sell, there’s no money in it, it’s day is done. I don’t believe one word. Whether there be money in it or not was never poetry’s point, and it’s day will never be done. They tell me people are afraid of poetry, they don’t understand it, they don’t know how to read it. I suggest reading it line by line, letting every word sink in slowly — drink it as you would a fine liquor, sip by sip, until the last word is gone. Even better, read it aloud (and loud). I assure you, my neighbors will never forget the day I read “Sonnets for Orpheus” at full strength. With poetry are such memories made.

We at Papaveria are very proud of this book, and hope you will find enjoyment in it, too.

Jack o’ the Hills

Jack o the Hills

Purchase at one of these sellers:
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Amazon.co.uk
Barnes & Noble
The Book Depository

Jack Yap once had his mouth sewn shut for talking too much. His brother Pudding has to wear stone shoes or he’ll just wander off. Will little obstacles like these keep the boys out of trouble? Not for the twinkling of an eye. There is magic in the hills, shapechangers and monsters, and Jack Yap has a hankering to meet them all and maybe kill a few. What he and Pudding find in the hills, however, changes both their lives, taking them out of the country and into the cruel and wonderful world, where witches and princesses await. Sometimes they are even the same person.

“The best story from the online Summer issue is also dark fantasy, this time blackly humorous: ‘Stone Shoes’, by C. S. E. Cooney, about Jack Yap and his brother Pudding and their Marm and a skinchanger’s egg — linguistically inventive, and slyly vicious.” –Rich Horton, from the January 2008 Locus

“Claire Cooney spins tales of Grimm horror with elvish gold gleaming in their darkness. They have the vivid colors of an extremely good nightmare, a fertile and vernal radiance all their own: funny and horrifying and moving by turns — and sometimes out of turn. If you’ve forgotten why you love fantasy, these stories of Jack Yap and Shapechanger Tam will remind you.” –James Enge, author of Blood of Ambrose, nominated for the 2009 World Fantasy Award.

“Stunningly delicious! Cruel, beautiful and irresistible are C.S.E. Cooney’s characters and prose. Just when you thought fantasy had devolved into endless repetition, ’Jack o’ the Hills’ blows us all over the next hill and into the kingdom beyond. C.S.E. Cooney is a rare and exciting new talent. Whatever she offers us next, I’ll waiting in line to read.” – Ellen Kushner, author of Thomas the Rhymer

Wonder Tales

C.S.E. Cooney has spent the last two years perched in an aerie of the Windy City. Her fiction and poetry can be found in Clockwork Phoenix 3, Subterranean Press, Strange Horizons, Apex Magazine, Ideomancer, Goblin Fruit, and Mythic Delirium.

The Winter Triptych

The Winter Triptych

This title is only available in digital format from Smashwords.

The Winter Triptych is a story plucked from a tapestry’s thread. In one panel Liese is a scullery maid working in Queenskeep, where tragedy and treason have ruled for one hundred years. In the night, she chases ghosts up a winding stair. There, in another, Isele is a traitor’s hope, and here a huntsman seeks to unwind them from a curse’s knot. The panels flow together as the story unfolds, until ghosts and curses collide at the top of the Keep.

“Nicole Kornher-Stace is a remarkably fresh literary voice that sounds like no other. The dreamscapes she paints with her words are magical and breathtaking. As dangerous as it may be, you still want to walk around in her world and get to know the people there.” – Ann VanderMeer, editor of Weird Tales

“Nicole Kornher-Stace ‘The Winter Triptych’ is an icily glittering marvel of storytelling construction. This wicked tale of evil queens, mad huntsmen, martyred witches and a terrible curse that unfolds over a century executes its sleight-of-hand in diabolical layers. The immediate tableau before your eyes never flags as it pulls you in with its sweeping cast of characters, coldly terrifying villains and earnestly compelling heroines. And underneath it all, piece after piece locks and turns into place, until the entire triptych unfolds in a stunning revelation of inexorable fate, time-bending wonder and blood-curdling horror. I hold Nicole in both awe and envy: at the start of her career, she has already produced a masterwork.” –Mike Allen, Nebula Award nominee and editor of Clockwork Phoenix

“‘Winter Triptych’ is a ghost story Maid Marion would have read to Robin Hood under the covers. Joan of Arc, discovering a kindred spirit a few chapters in, would straightway have dictated a fan letter to the author. Had the child Snow White been told this tale, she’d’ve knocked out stepmama’s gimlet eye with one speedball pitch of her poisoned apple, then run away to the greenwood to join up with Black Meg and her outlaw band. Nicole Kornher-Stace plays with Time like it was her very own Tetris game. She has crafted a Winter Triptych out of words that reveals some startling new detail every time you open it. ” – CSE Cooney, author of The Big Bah-Ha

“‘The Winter Triptych’ is a gorgeous labyrinth of words, a vivid dream-world of ghosts, ruined towers, mad queens, and revenge biding its time. Its language is as rich as plum-cake, but it presents the reader with a challenge as well, parts that fit together like puzzle-pieces to form a story familiar and yet not, darker and stranger than the fairytale we remember. This is a story to savor by a fire on a cold night. Be warned: it will continue to sing in your head long after you have laid down the book.” –Theodora Goss, author of In the Forest of Forgetting

Wonder Tales

Nicole Kornher-Stace was born in Philadelphia in 1983, moved from the East Coast to the West Coast and back again by the time she was five, and currently lives in New Paltz, NY, with one husband, two ferrets, one Changeling, and many many books. Her short fiction and poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in a number of magazines and anthologies, including Best American Fantasy, Clockwork Phoenix 3, and Fantasy Magazine. Her poem “The Changeling Always Wins” placed 2nd in the 2010 short form Rhysling Award, and her short fiction has been longlisted for the British Fantasy Awards and nominated for the Pushcart Prize. She is the author of one novel, Desideria, and her featured poems from the Summer 2009 issue of Goblin Fruit are collected in the lusciously-illustrated chapbook Demon Lovers and Other Difficulties. For further miscellany, check out her blog at wirewalking.livejournal.com